The Best Website Survey Questions To Ask (with examples)

Learn to ask the right questions at the right time with these simple tips.

What Questions Should I Ask on a Website Survey?

Website surveys can be used to gather all types of voice of customer feedback, but it’s only useful if you ask the right questions. We’ve compiled the most commonly used questions among our customers to put together the ultimate list of questions to choose from. Sometimes the right wording makes all the difference, so we’ve included a couple different examples for each question:

“Where exactly did you first find out about us?”

Purpose: Uncover how your visitors found out about you

Examples:

  • “Where exactly did you first find out about us?”
  • “How did you find our site?”
  • “What were the search terms you used to find our site?”

Tip: For these questions, we strongly recommend not giving visitors a list of options. Otherwise, the results will work against you by leading the customer to the sources you already know about. You want to uncover the answers that you don’t already know, and the best way to do this is to give your visitors the opportunity to tell you what they think.

“What did you come to this site to do today?”

Purpose: Understand Purpose of Visit / Intent

Examples:

  • “What did you come to this site to do today?”
  • “What were you hoping to find on this page?”
  • “What were you looking for?”

Tip: Focusing on the intentions a visitor is a great way to build an A/B test. Once you understand their intentions, you can test a variation of the page that targets that intention to see if performance improves.

“Does this page meet your expectations?”

Purpose: Investigate bounce rate

Examples:

  • “Does this page meet your expectations?”
  • “Did this page meet your expectations?”
  • “Does this page contain the information you were looking for?”

Tip: These questions are most useful on pages where bounce rate is critical: landing pages. Use these to find out whether your landing pages are giving visitors exactly what they need.

“Which other options did you consider before choosing our [Product name]?”

Purpose: Understand position relative to competition

Examples:

  • “Which other options did you consider before choosing our [Product name]?”
  • “Which of our competitors, both online and offline, did you consider before choosing our [Product name]?”

Tip: Often times we think we know our competitors, but the answer to this question can be surprisingly insightful in understanding the customer’s actual pain point.

“What topics would you like to see us write about next?”

Purpose: Uncover missing content

Examples:

  • “What topics would you like to see us write about next?”
  • “What other products would you like to see us offer?”
  • “Was this help section useful?”
  • “Did this article answer your question?”
  • “Were you able to find the information you were looking for?”
  • “What other information would you like to see on this page?”

Tip: You can easily use a website survey to solicit ideas for blog content by asking your readers what sort of things they would enjoy to see you talk about next. If your survey software supports it, piping the results into one of your marketing team’s Slack channels can spark creative discussions and get everyone speaking the same language as the audience.

“How likely is it that you will recommend our company to a friend or colleague?”

Purpose: Measure Net Promoter Score / Scale of Satisfaction

Examples:

  • “How likely is it that you will recommend our company to a friend or colleague?”
  • “How would you rate our service on a scale of 1 – 10?”
  • “How would you rate your overall experience on our site today?”

Tip: NPS surveys are great to always have running on your site to get a gauge of customer satisfaction compared others in your industry. However, keep in mind that the most important way you can use the results is as your own benchmark. If you are continually improving your own NPS, then you’re likely to be continually improving your customer satisfaction, growth, and revenue.

“What could we do to make this site more useful?”

Purpose: Uncover Issues

Examples:

  • “Is there anything preventing you from signing up at this point?”
  • “What’s preventing you from signing up?”
  • “What would change your mind about signing up for an account?”
  • “Is our pricing clear?”
  • “What could we do to make this site more useful?”
  • “On this page, it seems like I should be able to…”
  • “Is there anything on this site that doesn’t work the way you expected it to?”
  • “What’s preventing you from starting a trial?”
  • “Is there anything preventing you from completing your purchase?”
  • “What’s the one thing that nearly stopped you from starting a trial?”
  • “What is the primary reason why you’re canceling your account?”
  • “Was there anything about this checkout process that we should improve?”
  • “What prevented you from doing what you came to the site to do?”

Tip: Are you trying to understand why your visitors are leaving before signing up or making a purchase? Consider running an Exit Survey to catch your visitors who don’t plan to convert.

“What caught your attention about this site in your search results?”

Purpose: Uncover the appeals of your site / product
Examples:

  • “What caught your attention about this site in your search results?”
  • “What’s the biggest influence on your purchasing decision?”
  • “What persuaded you to purchase from us?”
  • “Please list the top three things that persuaded you to use us rather than a competitor.”
  • “What convinced you to pay for this service?”
  • “What persuaded you to start a trial?”
  • “What convinced you to signup for a trial?”

Tip: Visitors who are engaged with your service tend to be more willing to share their thoughts. Put the survey immediately after the purchase flow to maximize response rate.

“What was your biggest fear or concern about purchasing from us?”

Purpose: Understand reservations with using or purchasing product

Examples:

  • “What was your biggest fear or concern about purchasing from us?”
  • “If you did not make a purchase today, can you tell us why not?”
  • “What would’ve convinced you to complete the purchase of the item(s) in your cart?”
  • “Do you have any questions before you complete your purchase?”
  • “What’s the one thing that nearly stopped you buying from us?”
  • “What was your biggest fear or concern about using us?”
  • “What was your biggest challenge, frustration or problem in finding the [Product name] online?”
  • “What could we change to make you want to continue using us?”
  • “Do you have any questions before starting a free trial?”
  • “Do you plan to start a trial?”

Tip: Same as above, if you put the survey question for this immediately after purchase, you’ll be able to maximize response rate from your target demographic.

“Of these four options, what’s the next thing you think we should build?”

Purpose: Solicit Product Feedback

Examples:

  • “What’s one feature we can add that would make our product indispensable for you?”
  • “Of these four options, what’s the next thing you think we should build?”
  • “How often do you use this feature?”
  • “How would you feel if we discontinued this feature?”
  • “What’s the next feature we should build?”
  • “How disappointed would you be if you could no longer use [Product/feature name?]”
  • “Have feedback or an idea? Leave it here!”

Tip: Asking more pointed question results in clearer, more actionable data. These questions are written in a generic fashion, but we recommend tailoring these questions to tie into your product or service.


What is a Website Survey?

A website survey is a survey that is run on a website to collect VOICE OF CUSTOMER FEEDBACK from website visitors. Website surveys have the advantage of getting feedback from visitors to your website who would otherwise remain anonymous. Because only a small percentage of website visitors ever become your customers or join your email list, website surveys represent a powerful and effective way to understand the needs and challenges of your visitors.

Website surveys can be used to improve the CONVERSION RATE OF A WEBSITE by understanding what visitors need in order to feel comfortable making a decision after viewing the website.

How do Website Surveys Work?

Most website survey software functions in the same way: they are displayed after a brief delay to visitors to a website who meet a set of criteria that are defined before hand. When the survey appears and to whom vary by website and are set by the people running the survey.

Different website survey software offer different controls, but most provide the following targeting:

Most website survey software functions in the same way: they are displayed after a brief delay to visitors to a website who meet a set of criteria that are defined before hand. When the survey appears and to whom vary by website and are set by the people running the survey.

  • Target visitors by traffic source – This allows the website survey to be directed to visitors who only come from a particular source, such as an ad campaign, search engine or social media.
  • Target visitors by visit length or depth – This allows the website survey to be delivered only to people who spend a certain amount of time or visit a specified number of pages on the site.
  • Target by visit number – Using cookies many website surveys can target visitors based on the number of visits they’ve made to the site.
  • Target by activity – This targeting allows the website survey to be targeted only to visitors who take certain actions, like attempt to navigate away from the website.

Website Survey Example

While website surveys have a variety of appearances, most appear in a similar fashion as a window or dialogue that pops up over the website design. This pop up event makes the survey noticeable and causes the website visitor to take action, either completing the website survey or dismissing it.

Example of a Qualaroo website NPS survey in action:


What are the Best Website Survey Tools?

There are a plethora of tools available at a wide range of prices, and many tools overlap in the features that are offered. So, to help you out, we’ve put together a list of all of the best tools on the market:

  • Qualaroo – “Automate User Research” – Qualaroo is one of the first and best known tools when it comes to collecting feedback. Their strengths are in the easy segmentation of customers as well as sentiment analysis by IBM Watson.
  • Usabilla – “Build Future-Proof Customer Experiences” – Usabilla offers a variety of ways to collect user feedback, including the ability to send surveys via email. Their headquarters are in Amsterdam so they cater more to the European market.
  • Pendo.io – “Understand and Guide Your Users” – Pendo’s main focus is around product analytics and onboarding, with feedback as an additional feature. It’s a good tool to use for PMs looking for a larger product-management toolset.
  • UserVoice – “User Feedback Made Easy” – UserVoice’s primary product is a separate web portal that allows users to share and vote on product ideas, which can be useful for engaging large user bases.
  • UserZoom – “User Experience Research and User Testing Platform” – UserZoom is a more services and research focused platform that recruits participants that engage in UX studies. This is most useful for teams with more UX resources that can be dedicated to creating more complex UX experiments.
  • Survicate – “Where Leading Teams Collect and Act on User Feedback” – Survicate has both mobile, web, and email feedback features. Their differentiator is the number of integrations that they have with platforms such as Intercom, Salesforce, and HubSpot.


Why Should I Use a Website Survey?

If you’re a marketer, website surveys are the best way to collect voice of customer feedback from anonymous website visitors. This feedback is invaluable in improving the performance of your website. Analytics packages tell you what is happening on your website. Website survey software tells you why.

Website surveys can be used to improve all areas of your business and help uncover insights that help grow your business.

  • Insights to optimize your website – Website surveys can give you voice of customer feedback that tells you what is preventing them from converting on your site. You can use this information to inform your A/B tests and improve conversion rates. If users express confusion about your return policy, for example, you can test whether making it more prominent improves purchase rates.
  • Insights to improve marketing – Understanding the intent of your website visitors and what they are hoping to accomplish is a great way to identify the benefits and features to highlight to customers in your marketing efforts both on and off site. Learning where visitors first heard of you is an effective way to prioritize investment in future marketing activities. Both efforts can lead to improved return on marketing spend.
  • Insights to improve product – Customer feedback has always been a valuable part of product development. Now you can easily hear from visitors who are considering a purchase, not just those that already bought.
  • Insights to unlock growth – Ultimately all of these insights can lead to an improved growth rate for your business. By tapping into the needs, wants and intent of your website visitors you can hone your message and offer to attract the highest number of most qualified prospects, driving your business forward.

Get Started!

We are happy to get you started with Website Surveys! We have written a robust guide detailing tips and steps to building your own Feedback Engine. At the end of the guide, we have listed Top Questions To Ask Your Customers and Prospects with advice on who, when, how, and where to ask these questions.

The guide will help you gather crucial insights from your prospects and customers, connect research to dollars both saved and generated, and improve customer experience. This strategic feedback engine guide will help you know what decisions your users are making and why.